Kansas Crane operator training, licensing and safety information

Kansas crane license

Licensing information

As of today there are no licensing requirements to operate a Crane. Please note this could change at any time.


If you have not obtained your OSHA Accredited Crane Operator Certificate, click the link now!!!


News Articles


Kansas City OSHA office holds safety training following worker death in trench collapse The training was held at the request of the Grandview, Mo., fire chief following the death of a local worker killed when an 8-foot-deep trench he was working in collapsed. Representatives of three cities that attended informed OSHA that they would not issue permits without evidence of proper trench protection, and would close jobs and cancel the permits if they found a contractor working in a trench without protection.

Last year, 26 workers were killed in trench collapses nationwide. Trenches five feet deep or greater require protective systems.
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The training was held at the request of the Grandview, Mo., fire chief following the death of a local worker killed when an 8-foot-deep trench he was working in collapsed. Representatives of three cities that attended informed OSHA that they would not issue permits without evidence of proper trench protection, and would close jobs and cancel the permits if they found a contractor working in a trench without protection.
Last year, 26 workers were killed in trench collapses nationwide. Trenches five feet deep or greater require protective systems.


Local school says good training is key to crane operators' safety
Nearly every morning, school administrators post a media story on the board about another on-the-job crane accident from somewhere in the United States, with body counts often noted in the headlines. Thursday's crane collapse in Oklahoma City, which resulted in one death, is the most recent example. "There's an accident worldwide almost everyday,” said Jerry McGinnis, college president. "But they can be avoided.” According to Forster Barnes, the lead crane instructor at the Oklahoma College of Construction, about 50 percent of accidents can be linked to improperly trained workers. "Most of these accidents can be avoided,” he said. "It's a combination of being better prepared in the classroom and in training, and just taking your time in the field.”
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Barnes said many of the workers involved in these accidents graduate from abbreviated three- or five-day programs, during which they can earn temporary certification. He believes such rushed schooling can leave workers unprepared to both operate cranes and assemble them. To remedy this, 15 states and six cities have passed legislation requiring workers to have crane-operating licenses, which require potential operators to pass standardized tests. The tests have both written and hands-on components. But New York, Florida and Texas, where major crane accidents have occurred recently, don't require such licensing. Neither does Oklahoma.

Barnes said that's no coincidence. He believes if all crane operators received the training that students at the Oklahoma College of Construction receive, the bulletin board in the Career Services Resource Center would be a lot emptier. The college requires students to take three- or six-week courses and to pass written and hands-on tests before certification is issued. "These kids are prepared when they graduate from here,” Barnes said. The college has been recognized as a national leader in safety and in almost every other major aspect of crane training. In 2005, the National Association of Heavy Equipment Training Schools, certified the Oklahoma College of Construction as one of only five member schools throughout the country — institutions that provide top-of-the-line training and job placement.

*It is essential that you check with your local government and confirm that the information listed above is still good today. This information
should only be used as a tool to help you figure out what type of license you need to operate certain types of equipment.



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