Archive for January, 2015

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Crane from the good old days

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Employers Must Read This

WHAT DOES A CRANE OPERATOR NEED TO BE COMPLIANT RIGHT NOW?
USDOL OSHA JUST PASSED NEW REGULATIONS WITH THE EXTENSION ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2014. YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS!

FOR LICENSING STATES
If you employ crane operators in a state that issues crane licenses then you must complete all three tasks below.
1- Have your operators obtain a state license
2- Have your operators obtain proof of training per OSHA Subpart CC 1926.1427
3- Have your operators obtain crane specific training and/or job specific training.
This should include reading and understanding the operators manual

FOR NON-LICENSING STATES
If you’re working in a state that does not issue crane licenses then you must complete both tasks below to be qualified to run a crane in that state.

1.Have your operators obtain proof of training per OSHA Subpart CC 1926.1427(j)
2.Have your operators obtain crane specific training and/or job specific training.
This should include reading and understanding the operators manual

This responsibility has been put on the employer, not the employee.

The text below was copied verbatim from OSHA’s final rule published in the Federal register on September 26, 2014
and from the final rule Subpart CC published November 8, 2010

In the notice of proposed rulemaking, OSHA also noted that a parallel training requirement in § 1926.1430(c) (2) reiterates the training requirement in paragraph 1427(k)(2), specifying that the training occur during the four-year transition period. OSHA preliminarily determined that it did not need to amend § 1430(c)(2) because it believed that amending § 1427(k)(2) was sufficient to extend the relevant employer training duty for employers. OSHA asked for comment on this issue, and received none. The Agency continues to believe that no amendment of § 1430(c)(2) is necessary, and therefore it has not changed that provision in the final rule.

What’s the difference between the NCCCO, CIC, NCCER and the OECP?

This question keeps popping up in crane circles and I’ve seen some confusion results from it. All 4 of these organizations have been accredited to certify crane operators. The certification comes from the NCCA, ANSI, or both, and meets the criteria established by OSHA Subpart CC for Crane Operator Certification.

The NCCCO awards a certificate referred to as a CCO. They are the oldest organization of the four. Their name is to the crane industry like Xerox is to the copier business. I still call our Konica Minolta copier in the office a Xerox machine.

You may encounter government entities or construction companies erroneously referring to the crane operator certificate as a “CCO”. Some states and construction companies have written policies that refer erroneously and specifically to the “CCO” only. That situation is getting cleared up as more crane operators are obtaining CIC, NCCER and OECP certificates.

What’s really important to you when you’re looking for Crane Operator training and certification? The questionnaire below was compiled from information gleaned from our experiences.

Questions to ask the provider when searching to obtain a Crane Operator Certificate:

  • Can you do the whole job? Do you provide the training and testing?
  • Do you offer crane operator training?
  • Can you do the whole program at my place?
  • Do you have a location where I can receive crane operator training and complete all my testing?
  • If I fail any part of my test what is involved in retesting?
  • What hours are you open for testing/re-testing?
  • What is the availability of a crane for testing?
  • What is your involvement in the crane industry?

Jay Sturm President/Cranes101

Safety is our only business and we at Cranes101 are working diligently to make ourselves the single best provider of Crane Operator training by offering the best user-friendly programs.

 

Employer of Crane Operators

Are you aware that this year, OSHA changed your responsibilities on September 26th, and on October 17th, issued a new directive?

The link above will open the PDF file located on the OSHA.gov website.